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Old 7th September 2012   #10
aspiringwriter
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Default Re: Tutorials you found on the internet









---------- Post added 7th September 2012 at 03:55 PM ----------

  1. All living creatures, fictional or not, have anatomy. Equally true of an amoeba, an angle worm, a mastodon , and a Grinch.
  2. If you want believability in your characters, you must have visual consistency. In animation, each character must move according to its own anatomical limitations: Daffy duck must move with Daffy Duck’s anatomy, Donald Duck with Donald Duck’s structure. The amoeba’s anatomy seems to have only one restriction - its bulk; like an inflated baloon, it can vary its shape, but it cannot change its volume. That is, if you want a believable amoeba
  3. All animals - humanized animals or animalized animals - must appear to stand, walk , run or skip under the stablizing pressure of gravity in order to achieve believeability
  4. There is no sympathy without believability, no real laughter without sympathy.
  5. In the sympathetic recognition of any character there must be some evidence of one’s own self, one’s own weaknesses, one’s own mistakes, no matter how well self-concealed, buttoned down or pigeonholded.
  6. The flimmaker as well as the viewer must be able to find the character within himself. We cannot fashion personalities from what we SUPPOSE another person to be.
  7. If you start with character, you probably will end up with good drawings. If you start out with drawings you will almost certinly end up with limited characters, caught in the matrix of your limited drawing. Therefore…
  8. It is not what or where a character is, nor is it the circumsances under which he finds himself that determine who he is. It is only how in a unique way he responds to that enviorment and those circumstances that identifies him as an individual. Hopefully, an interesting character becomes interesting because of that uniqueness among his contemporaries.
  9. For identity, you do not DRAW differently, you THINK differently. It is the WHO of the character , not the WHAT that counts. Walk- through circus clowns depend upon WHAT they look like for their brand of comedy. That is WHAT they are. Comedians depend upon HOW they move for comedy and pathos - their wonderful who-ness.
  10. As the writer John Buchan said, you will never succeed in playing a part unless you convince yourself that you are it.
  11. Animation means to invoke life, not to imitate it.
  12. no great children’s book, film or fable was ever written for children. It was written for the witer, the artist , the flimmaker. Again, the mark of any ’ great work ’ for children, from one by Beatrix Potter to a book br Dr. Seuss , can be easily identified: if it can be read with pleasure by adults it is probably a very good, possibly a great, childrens book.
  13. you cannot write DOWN to an audience or to your subject. You must write UP to them with the certainty that you cannot ever do justice to your subject, but must bend every creative nerve and muscle of your heart and brain to its full capacity in an attempt to do so.
  14. The least you owe an audience is the best you can do
  15. No art form can exist without restrictive disciplines. Most of the great paintings in history have been caught in the terrible discipline of the rectangle. The flimmaker finds himself trapped in the exact and severe disciplines of both the rectangle an time. Most cinema features are in a time warm of 90 to 120 minutes, most animated cartoon shorts in a confinement of 6 minutes.
  16. You must not complain of your restrictions. If you cannot live with them, find a discipline you can live with.
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Above is a section from Chuck Jone’s book Chuck Reducks. I’ve bolded some of my favorite and most inspirational rules. Forgive me some spelling errors. I was staring at the book while I was typing so I wasnt really watching the screen haha.


---------- Post added 7th September 2012 at 03:56 PM ----------


So I’ve had a couple people ask me about how to get started on their own comic project, or how to get into making comics, so I’m gonna write some stuff about it.

It should be obvious, but writing a comic is a really big commitment! There are a lot of things that factor into this— how long you want your comic to run, how much work and time each page requires, how complex your story is. Writing good stories is hard, and in all likelihood, you will probably wind up drawing stuff that you don’t normally draw. Chances are, it’s going to be more effort than you first estimate.
Don’t be intimidated by the amount of work it takes, though— just be aware of the scope of the project you’re taking on! If you’re not sure you can handle a long-running serialized comic, maybe try a shorter comic first. See if you can encapsulate a story in only ten pages. Make a pilot for a bigger story you want to tackle later. Team up with an artist or writer and split the work. It’s okay to test the medium with something small! Don’t bite off more than you can chew, only to be burnt out later.

I’m assuming if you want to make a comic, you probably read and enjoy at least a few of them, but I’ll reinforce it: read lots of comics. See how other people do it. Steal like an artist. Watch movies. Analyze why you like them and why you don’t. Apply it to your story. Write down every single tiny idea that you get. Read books. Specifically, I’d highly recommend Characters & Viewpoint by Orson Scott Card and Making Comics by Scott McCloud. Expand your visual library. Figure out what you like, and apply it to what you make.

This should be pretty self-explanatory. If you’re going to write a comic, write it about something you care about. I think this is more important than making something that’s “marketable”, or that fits a certain niche— if you really care about what you’re creating, it’ll show.
Unless you’re making comics for a living (in which case, why are you even reading this, you probably already know what you’re doing) you should probably strive to enjoy what you’re creating. The more you love what you make, the less tedious it will be to make it.

Nothing stifles creativity more than realizing you haven’t planned past this point and have to make up the rest of the story by next week or your comic will have to end. Planning is really vital, especially if you’re going to be creating a long-running comic with regular updates. You should know the beginning and end of your story before you ever start drawing pages, and have at least a good idea of what’s going to go on in the middle. Even if you add, remove, or change things later, it’s better than having to make stuff up under a deadline.
The more you plan now, the less you have to fly by the seat of your pants and make things up under pressure. Art is a lot more flexible than story, and it’s likely that your work will improve as you work more in the medium, but it’s good to know what format you’ll be drawing in (strips, full-page, flash, or otherwise) and the tools you’ll be using to draw it. This is another reason why I highly recommend making a short-story comic on your first try— it may turn out that the tools you thought you should use are far more time-consuming and difficult than you anticipated! It’ll also help you gauge how long a page can take, which will help you make decisions in terms of style, coloring, and update schedule.

If you really want to try your hand at making comics, stop looking for excuses not to.
If you don’t have the time to create something large and epic which will take months or years to fully complete the story, make something smaller. If you don’t think your art is good enough, draw it anyway. If you don’t know how to write/draw, see if you can team up with someone who does. Make something that you can be proud of. Even if it turns out that comics aren’t really your bag, you won’t regret giving it a try.
So hey if you read this far CONGRATULATIONS you read this whole thing! If you like what I have to say you can always read my comic, Chaos, here at Smackjeeves or, alternately, on ComicFury, or even check it out here on tumblr if that’s your bag. I’ve also got an art blog, if you’d like to see what other not-comic stuff I actually draw. I hope this helps you! Go make some comics!

---------- Post added 7th September 2012 at 03:58 PM ----------

Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Here are 102 resources on Character, Point of View, Dialogue, Plot, Conflict, Structure, Outlining, Setting, and World Building, plus some links to generate Ideas and Inspiration.
CHARACTER, POINT OF VIEW, DIALOGUE

10 Days of Character Building
Name Generators
Name Playground
The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test
Priming the idea pump (A character checklist shamlessly lifted from acting)
How to Create a Character
Seven Common Character Types
Handling a Cast of Thousands – Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters
It’s Not What They Say …

Establishing the Right Point of View: How to Avoid “Stepping Out of Character”
How to Start Writing in the Third Person
Web Resources for Developing Characters
What are the Sixteen Master Archetypes?
Character: A compilation of guidance from classical and contemporary experts on creating great dramatic characters
Building Fictional Characters
Fiction Writer’s Character Chart
Character Building Workshop
Tips for Characterization
Fiction Writer’s Character Chart
Villains are People, Too, But …
Top 10 Tips for Writing Dialogue
Speaking of Dialogue
Dialogue Tips
Advantages, Disadvantages and Skills (character traits)
How to Write a Character Bible
Character Development Exercises
All Your Characters Sounds the Same — And They’re Not a Hivemind!
Medieval Names Archive
Sympathy Without Saintliness
Writing the Other: Bridging Cultural Difference for Successful Fiction
Family Echo (family tree website)
Interviewing Characters: Follow the Energy
100 Character Development Questions for Writers
Behind the Name
Lineage Chart Layout Generator
PLOT, CONFLICT, STRUCTURE, OUTLINE
How to Write a Novel: The Snowflake Method
Effectively Outlining Your Plot
Conflict and Character within Story Structure
Outlining Your Plot
Ideas, Plots & Using the Premise Sheets
How to Write a Novel
Creating Conflict and Sustaining Suspense
Plunge Right In … Into Your Story, That Is!
Fiction Writing Tips: Story Grid
Tips for Creating a Compelling Plot
Writer’s “Cheat Sheets”
The Thirty-six (plus one) Dramatic Situations
The Evil Overlord Devises a Plot: Excerpt from Stupid Plotting Tricks
Conflict Test
What is Conflict?
Monomyth
The Hero’s Journey: Summary of the Steps
Outline Your Novel in Thirty Minutes
Plotting Without Fears
Novel Outlining 101
Writing the Perfect Scene
Fight Scenes 101
Basic Plots in Literature
One-Page Plotting
The Great Swampy Middle
SETTING, WORLD BUILDING
Magical World Builder’s Guide
I Love the End of the World
World Building 101
The Art of Description: Eight Tips to Help You Bring Your Settings to Life
Creating the Perfect Setting – Part I
Creating a Believable World
An Impatient Writer’s Approach to Worldbuilding
Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions
Setting
Character and Setting Interactions
Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
Creating Fantasy Worlds
Questions About Worldbuilding
Maps Workshop — Developing the Fictional World Through Mapping
World Builder Projects
IDEAS, INSPIRATION
Quick Story Idea Generator
Solve Your Problems Simply by Saying Them Out Loud
Busting Your Writing Rut
Writing Inspiration, or Sex on a Bicycle
Creative Acceleration: 11 Tips to Engineer a Productive Flow
The Seven Major Beginner Mistakes
Complete Your First Book with these 9 Simple Writing Habits
Free Association, Active Imagination, Twilight Imaging
Random Book Title Generator
Finishing Your Novel
Story Starters and Idea Generators
REVISION
How to Rewrite
One-Pass Manuscript Revision: From First Draft to Last in One Cycle
Editing Recipe
Cliche Finder
Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written
Writing 101: So You Want to Write a Novel Part 3: Revising a Novel
TOOLS and SOFTWARE
My Writing Nook (online text editor; free)
Bubbl.us (online mind map application; free)
Freemind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)
XMind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)
Liquid Story Binder (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $45.95; Windows, portable)
Scrivener (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $39.95; Mac)
SuperNotecard (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $29; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)
yWriter (novel organization and writing software; free; Windows, Linux, portable)
JDarkRoom (minimalist text editor; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)
AutoRealm (map creation software; free; Windows, Linux with Wine)
I don’t even write stories. But it might come in handy???

---------- Post added 7th September 2012 at 03:59 PM ----------

Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Here are 102 resources on Character, Point of View, Dialogue, Plot, Conflict, Structure, Outlining, Setting, and World Building, plus some links to generate Ideas and Inspiration.
CHARACTER, POINT OF VIEW, DIALOGUE

10 Days of Character Building
Name Generators
Name Playground
The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test
Priming the idea pump (A character checklist shamlessly lifted from acting)
How to Create a Character
Seven Common Character Types
Handling a Cast of Thousands – Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters
It’s Not What They Say …

Establishing the Right Point of View: How to Avoid “Stepping Out of Character”
How to Start Writing in the Third Person
Web Resources for Developing Characters
What are the Sixteen Master Archetypes?
Character: A compilation of guidance from classical and contemporary experts on creating great dramatic characters
Building Fictional Characters
Fiction Writer’s Character Chart
Character Building Workshop
Tips for Characterization
Fiction Writer’s Character Chart
Villains are People, Too, But …
Top 10 Tips for Writing Dialogue
Speaking of Dialogue
Dialogue Tips
Advantages, Disadvantages and Skills (character traits)
How to Write a Character Bible
Character Development Exercises
All Your Characters Sounds the Same — And They’re Not a Hivemind!
Medieval Names Archive
Sympathy Without Saintliness
Writing the Other: Bridging Cultural Difference for Successful Fiction
Family Echo (family tree website)
Interviewing Characters: Follow the Energy
100 Character Development Questions for Writers
Behind the Name
Lineage Chart Layout Generator
PLOT, CONFLICT, STRUCTURE, OUTLINE
How to Write a Novel: The Snowflake Method
Effectively Outlining Your Plot
Conflict and Character within Story Structure
Outlining Your Plot
Ideas, Plots & Using the Premise Sheets
How to Write a Novel
Creating Conflict and Sustaining Suspense
Plunge Right In … Into Your Story, That Is!
Fiction Writing Tips: Story Grid
Tips for Creating a Compelling Plot
Writer’s “Cheat Sheets”
The Thirty-six (plus one) Dramatic Situations
The Evil Overlord Devises a Plot: Excerpt from Stupid Plotting Tricks
Conflict Test
What is Conflict?
Monomyth
The Hero’s Journey: Summary of the Steps
Outline Your Novel in Thirty Minutes
Plotting Without Fears
Novel Outlining 101
Writing the Perfect Scene
Fight Scenes 101
Basic Plots in Literature
One-Page Plotting
The Great Swampy Middle
SETTING, WORLD BUILDING
Magical World Builder’s Guide
I Love the End of the World
World Building 101
The Art of Description: Eight Tips to Help You Bring Your Settings to Life
Creating the Perfect Setting – Part I
Creating a Believable World
An Impatient Writer’s Approach to Worldbuilding
Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions
Setting
Character and Setting Interactions
Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
Creating Fantasy Worlds
Questions About Worldbuilding
Maps Workshop — Developing the Fictional World Through Mapping
World Builder Projects
IDEAS, INSPIRATION
Quick Story Idea Generator
Solve Your Problems Simply by Saying Them Out Loud
Busting Your Writing Rut
Writing Inspiration, or Sex on a Bicycle
Creative Acceleration: 11 Tips to Engineer a Productive Flow
The Seven Major Beginner Mistakes
Complete Your First Book with these 9 Simple Writing Habits
Free Association, Active Imagination, Twilight Imaging
Random Book Title Generator
Finishing Your Novel
Story Starters and Idea Generators
REVISION
How to Rewrite
One-Pass Manuscript Revision: From First Draft to Last in One Cycle
Editing Recipe
Cliche Finder
Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written
Writing 101: So You Want to Write a Novel Part 3: Revising a Novel
TOOLS and SOFTWARE
My Writing Nook (online text editor; free)
Bubbl.us (online mind map application; free)
Freemind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)
XMind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)
Liquid Story Binder (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $45.95; Windows, portable)
Scrivener (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $39.95; Mac)
SuperNotecard (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $29; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)
yWriter (novel organization and writing software; free; Windows, Linux, portable)
JDarkRoom (minimalist text editor; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)
AutoRealm (map creation software; free; Windows, Linux with Wine)
I don’t even write stories. But it might come in handy???

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